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Cheaper or even free: That is how much two bananas could have cost Rahul Bose

Cheaper or even free: That is how much two bananas could have cost Rahul Bose

rahul bose, rahul bose bananas, gst on bananas, hotel bananas, jw marriott hotel

rahul bose, rahul bose bananas, gst on bananas, hotel bananas, jw marriott hotel

Rahul Bose’s banana bill:  People also posted their ‘Rahul Bose moment’ on social media, sharing pictures of bills from hotels where they were charged a bomb. (Designed by Rajan Sharma)

A pair of ripe bananas for Rs 442. While the price was exorbitant enough for Rahul Bose to take to Twitter and post the bill of a five-star hotel, we also went bananas and tried finding out the fruit’s cost — no, not at sabzi mandis, but from chefs. Bose, in a video of himself at JW Marriott in Chandigarh, wrote: “You have to see this to believe it. Who said fruit wasn’t harmful to your existence?”. He had signed off with hashtag- #GoingBananas

The cost of the humble bananas, presented as a “fruit platter”, has left a certain section of the hotel industry stunned as well. Chef Manish Mehrotra from Indian Accent, which has been awarded the Best Restaurant in India for five consecutive years and ranked 17 in The World’s 50 Best, said he would have preferred to give two ripe bananas for free at his restaurant. “Buying something from the market and offering it without putting any extra effort, doesn’t justify the extra charge,” the chef told indianexpress.com.

“I know Rahul; the hotel he stayed at didn’t do anything to embellish the bananas, like cutting it in an appealing manner or garnishing with nuts, so it doesn’t really make sense,” he remarked.

Amey Pravin Mhatre, chef at De Partie in Taj Wellington, a property of Taj Mahal Mumbai, informed that they charge Rs 300 for a large fruit platter. He, however, added that because they (JW Marriott) did not have any other category to peg the bill under, it read ‘fruit platter’, saying that, “they could have billed it under Chef’s Special and charged him Rs 100 or Rs 200 for a couple of bananas”.

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When asked what the Taj charges for two bananas, the chef said that they sell it on MRP at Taj Deli Mart where guests can buy fresh organic fruits, cereals, variety of basic items as well as some healthy raw items at market rates. “We don’t charge a fruit platter price for two bananas. All the hype that this incident created wasn’t required because if you stay in a five-star hotel, you do not just pay for the products but also for their excellent services and for an actor like Bose it shouldn’t be a big deal,” the chef opined.

People also posted their ‘Rahul Bose moment‘ on social media, sharing pictures of bills from luxurious hotels where they were charged an ‘extravagant’ amount. The banana, commonly known as the poor man’s fruit in India, is among the most affordable and a dozen come for around Rs 40, with a kilo costing around Rs 60-65. An easy source of potassium, the fruit is highly preferred by fitness enthusiasts.

While sources in the hotel industry justified to The Indian Express saying that a five-star hotel (where room rent is Rs 7,500 and above per night) can charge 18 per cent tax on sale of an item, GST experts said that as per law, fresh fruits are not taxable at all.

Meanwhile, according to excise officials, the case is prima facie a violation of the Consumer Protection Act, 1986. Chandigarh Deputy Commissioner and Excise and Taxation Commissioner Mandip Singh Brar ordered an investigation to probe the levying of GST on two fresh bananas at JW Marriott hotel and a three-member team visited the hotel in Sector 35 and seized the relevant records.

Assistant Excise and Taxation Commissioner Rajeev Chaudhary told Chandigarh Newsline, “ETOs have seized all relevant records. The question here is that fresh fruits are tax-free items, whatever the case may be, and ‘fruit platter’ is a taxable item. But the actor has been given fresh fruits and tax has been charged on it so we are investigating all angles. We are even probing whether relevant tax is being deposited regularly with the excise and taxation department or not.”

‘Demon Chef’ Alvin Leung opens restaurant in Malaysia

‘Demon Chef’ Alvin Leung opens restaurant in Malaysia

Known simply by his moniker “demon chef” Alvin Leung is a pivotal figure in Hong Kong’s culinary landscape. Leung first made a name for himself with his flagship restaurant Bo Innovation, which has retained three Michelin stars since 2013.

There, Leung popularised his signature X-Treme Chinese cuisine, throwing out all the rulebooks to create modern, inventive Oriental food. Leung is also a familiar face on MasterChef Canada, where he serves as a judge.

Now – for the first time ever – Malaysia will have an association with the famed chef through his partnership with Fuhu Restaurant & Bar, the new vibe dining concept by Zouk Group set to open tomorrow at Resorts World Genting.

“The launch of FUHU Restaurant & Bar is a monumental occasion for Zouk Group, as it marks our first foray into F&B,” says Andrew Li, chief executive officer of Zouk Group.

Leung's restaurant in Malaysia will feature a modern take on classic Chinese cuisine.

Leung’s restaurant in Malaysia will feature a modern take on classic Chinese cuisine.

“We are committed to providing the best, and there is no better way to mark this milestone than to partner a culinary mastermind such as Alvin Leung.”

Leung’s involvement is certain to inspire innovation and a bold, sanguine direction for Fuhu, which will feature a modern spin on classic Asian fare.

Menu items to look out for include Fuhu roasted duck, Boston lobster noodles, Szechuan-style hot & sour lobster soup and fried chicken and waffle.

Fuhu seats up to 150 diners and will feature an interplay of dining, nightlife and music, the latter of which the Zouk Group is most well-known for.

Aesthetically, the restaurant is designed to inspire wonder and joy, with a Chinese apothecary themed entrance, gargantuan sakura tree and floor-to-ceiling mural by grafitti artist Kenji Chai taking centrestage.

The next time you’re on an AirAsia flight, eat a burger

The next time you’re on an AirAsia flight, eat a burger

AirAsia has joined the fight to end AIDS with the creation of a new red-hot dish. The airline and Santan have teamed up with (RED) to create the INSPI(RED) Burger, a special in-flight meal.

The burger features a chicken patty infused with fish sauce, kaffir lime leaves and lemongrass, topped with zesty green chilli mayonnaise, shredded purple cabbage and tomato on a red beetroot bun.

The dish is created by New York-based (RED) chef ambassador Hong Thaimee, who drew inspiration from her Northern Thai roots to deliver an East-meets-West culinary experience.

“It’s not only a delicious option for passengers, it brings real awareness to the AIDS fight and helps raise critical funds to finance HIV/AIDS programmes in Asean,” said (RED) chief operating officer Jennifer Lotito.

AirAsia Group brand head Rudy Khaw said the partnership is an “ideal marriage of two Asean personalities in support of the region”.
Guests are encouraged to pre-book the meal on airasia.com.

For every INSPI(RED) Burger sold, 10% of the proceeds will go to the global fund to support HIV/AIDS testing, counselling, treatment and prevention programmes in the region.

AirAsia has also created a special line of co-branded (AirAsia)RED inflight merchandise such as a remix of the iconic AirAsia cap and an aircraft model. For each item sold, US$2 (RM8.27) will be donated to the global fund.

(RED) is a licensed brand that seeks to engage the private sector in raising awareness and funds to help eliminate HIV/AIDS in Africa.

In separate developments, AirAsia recently announced an expanded cooperative marketing agreement with Tourism Western Australia.

The agreement will see joint marketing campaigns developed to promote affordable flights to Western Australia.

In a new location and with a revamped menu, Diva Spiced mostly delivers on its promise of Asian food with a twist

In a new location and with a revamped menu, Diva Spiced mostly delivers on its promise of Asian food with a twist

ritu dalmia, diva spiced, diva spiced delhi, diva spiced restaurant, diva spiced gk, asian restaurant, meherchand market, food review, indian express news

ritu dalmia, diva spiced, diva spiced delhi, diva spiced restaurant, diva spiced gk, asian restaurant, meherchand market, food review, indian express news

The interiors of Diva Spiced

On a rainy afternoon, few things can offer the same comfort as a crisp samosa dunked in a bowl of hot, soothing kadhi. At Diva Spiced, Ritu Dalmia’s modern Asian restaurant, the Kadhi Samosa listed in the small plates section of the menu is one of the chef’s recommendations, and as we bit into ours, we could see why. The “homestyle” kadhi is as silky as one could hope for, gradually softening the samosa’s flaky crust, but what brings the dish alive, surprisingly, is the asafoetida (hing). That this should be so is a testimony to, firstly, the humble — usually optional — ingredient’s underrated role as a flavouring agent and, secondly, to the chef’s ability to properly recognise and use it.

It is the little things like this that made our lunch at the Diva Spiced interesting. The restaurant, which used to be located in Meherchand Market, opened this week at a new location in Greater Kailash 1’s N Block Market. It’s a bright, cosy space, ideal for lunch. The focus remains on pan-Asian food, although the attempt seems to be to better integrate east and southeast Asian ingredients and techniques with regional Indian food. So the Prawn and Kasundi Dimsum was effectively a Bengali-style prawn inside a dimsum wrapper; it may have been served with an assortment of sauces (the lemon-coriander sauce was especially good), but the pungency of the mustard paste was enough to carry the dish. The Panko crusted Eggplant Bao was another instant hit: the play of textures — with the soft, chewy bao, the crunchy eggplant and the creamy aioli — was perfect. We just wish there had been more than two baos on the plate. The Crispy Duck with caramelised Hazelnut and Chilli Orange dressing also made excellent use of contrasting textures; we wish more places would make use of duck skin, fried till crisp, as a highlight element on the plate.

ritu dalmia, diva spiced, diva spiced delhi, diva spiced restaurant, diva spiced gk, asian restaurant, meherchand market, food review, indian express news

ritu dalmia, diva spiced, diva spiced delhi, diva spiced restaurant, diva spiced gk, asian restaurant, meherchand market, food review, indian express news

Khao Suey

For the main course, we ordered the Calcutta Malai Curry with asparagus, lotus stem, rice and pachdi and Goan Kafreal Marinated Chicken, sesame carrots and pickled beetroot. The chicken was cooked to perfection, but it didn’t really make the palate sing. That it was not served with rice or any other carbohydrate made the dish monotonous in terms of both taste and texture. With the Malai Curry there were no complaints; there was some initial trepidation about whether, when combined with the pineapple pachadi (served like a chutney on the side), it may become a little too sweet, but those fears were soon calmed down. The curry was indeed on the sweeter side — as it is meant to be, thanks to the use of coconut milk — but the pineapple pachadi added the requisite touch of piquancy and sourness, lifting the whole dish. With the crisp slices of lotus stem and rice, it became one of those dishes that truly feels like a meal. The asparagus added colour and fibre to the plate, but the dish would have been just as good without it.

The dessert, however, left us with mixed feelings. The Coconut and Lemongrass Panacotta wobbled tantalizingly, like a good pana cotta does, and should ideally have been smooth throughout. With every bite, however, we tasted what felt like desiccated coconut — an experience that rather marred our enjoyment of what was otherwise a lovely dessert.

Meal for two (without drinks): Rs 4,000

Address: Diva Spiced, N-6, First Floor, Greater Kailash – 1

Bao Meets Baingan

Bao Meets Baingan

ritu dalmia, diva spiced, diva spiced delhi, diva spiced restaurant, diva spiced gk, asian restaurant, meherchand market, food review, indian express news

ritu dalmia, diva spiced, diva spiced delhi, diva spiced restaurant, diva spiced gk, asian restaurant, meherchand market, food review, indian express news

The interiors of Diva Spiced

On a rainy afternoon, few things can offer the same comfort as a crisp samosa dunked in a bowl of hot, soothing kadhi. At Diva Spiced, Ritu Dalmia’s modern Asian restaurant, the Kadhi Samosa listed in the small plates section of the menu is one of the chef’s recommendations, and as we bit into ours, we could see why. The “homestyle” kadhi is as silky as one could hope for, gradually softening the samosa’s flaky crust, but what brings the dish alive, surprisingly, is the asafoetida (hing). That this should be so is a testimony to, firstly, the humble — usually optional — ingredient’s underrated role as a flavouring agent and, secondly, to the chef’s ability to properly recognise and use it.

It is the little things like this that made our lunch at the Diva Spiced interesting. The restaurant, which used to be located in Meherchand Market, opened this week at a new location in Greater Kailash 1’s N Block Market. It’s a bright, cosy space, ideal for lunch. The focus remains on pan-Asian food, although the attempt seems to be to better integrate east and southeast Asian ingredients and techniques with regional Indian food. So the Prawn and Kasundi Dimsum was effectively a Bengali-style prawn inside a dimsum wrapper; it may have been served with an assortment of sauces (the lemon-coriander sauce was especially good), but the pungency of the mustard paste was enough to carry the dish. The Panko crusted Eggplant Bao was another instant hit: the play of textures — with the soft, chewy bao, the crunchy eggplant and the creamy aioli — was perfect. We just wish there had been more than two baos on the plate. The Crispy Duck with caramelised Hazelnut and Chilli Orange dressing also made excellent use of contrasting textures; we wish more places would make use of duck skin, fried till crisp, as a highlight element on the plate.

ritu dalmia, diva spiced, diva spiced delhi, diva spiced restaurant, diva spiced gk, asian restaurant, meherchand market, food review, indian express news

ritu dalmia, diva spiced, diva spiced delhi, diva spiced restaurant, diva spiced gk, asian restaurant, meherchand market, food review, indian express news

Khao Suey

For the main course, we ordered the Calcutta Malai Curry with asparagus, lotus stem, rice and pachdi and Goan Kafreal Marinated Chicken, sesame carrots and pickled beetroot. The chicken was cooked to perfection, but it didn’t really make the palate sing. That it was not served with rice or any other carbohydrate made the dish monotonous in terms of both taste and texture. With the Malai Curry there were no complaints; there was some initial trepidation about whether, when combined with the pineapple pachadi (served like a chutney on the side), it may become a little too sweet, but those fears were soon calmed down. The curry was indeed on the sweeter side — as it is meant to be, thanks to the use of coconut milk — but the pineapple pachadi added the requisite touch of piquancy and sourness, lifting the whole dish. With the crisp slices of lotus stem and rice, it became one of those dishes that truly feels like a meal. The asparagus added colour and fibre to the plate, but the dish would have been just as good without it.

The dessert, however, left us with mixed feelings. The Coconut and Lemongrass Panacotta wobbled tantalizingly, like a good pana cotta does, and should ideally have been smooth throughout. With every bite, however, we tasted what felt like desiccated coconut — an experience that rather marred our enjoyment of what was otherwise a lovely dessert.

Meal for two (without drinks): Rs 4,000

Address: Diva Spiced, N-6, First Floor, Greater Kailash – 1

Jillian Michaels swears by these 6 exercises for toned arms

Jillian Michaels swears by these 6 exercises for toned arms

  • Jillian Michaels is a celebrity fitness trainer and former coach on the television show “The Biggest Loser.”
  • She told INSIDER her go-to exercises for toning arm, back, and shoulder muscles.
  • Michaels gravitates toward functional moves, or exercises that strengthen muscles for daily movements, like pushups, planks, and the down dog yoga pose.
  • Visit INSIDER’s homepage for more.

As a former coach on “The Biggest Loser” and one of the most well-known celebrity fitness trainers today, Jillian Michaels knows a thing or two about fitness.

In a recent interview with INSIDER to promote her 100-mile walking challenge to raise funds for refugees, Michaels shared her top fitness tips including targeted exercises for toning your arms, shoulders, and back.

Michaels told INSIDER she gravitates toward functional exercises, or those that strengthen the body for daily movements. She doesn’t focus on a single muscle group more than twice per week in order to allow those muscles to recover. “Recovery is where the progress is made,” she said, adding that you should take two days of rest in between single-muscle-group sessions.

Here are the exercises Michaels recommends for toned arms. The moves can also benefit your back and shoulders.


Tricep dips can be done almost anywhere.

caption
You can do tricep dips on a park bench if you don’t have equipment.
source
progressman/Shutterstock

Michaels suggested dips for toning your triceps, the muscles at the back of your upper arms.

Tricep dips can be done virtually anywhere, like a park bench, kitchen chair, or even the floor, so they’re great for people who don’t have workout equipment or a gym membership.

To do a tricep dip, keep your shoulders back and relaxed, bend your knees, and position yourself in front of the chair or bench. Bend and extend your elbows slowly.

Read more: 11 exercises personal trainers swear by to get in shape fast – and 3 they’d never recommend


Pushups are a classic exercise for people at all fitness levels.

caption
You can modify pushups to make them easier or more difficult.
source
White House

Michaels recommended pushups, a classic but often overlooked exercise that targets the chest, back, shoulder, and tricep muscles all at once.

Pushups can be modified to make them easier or harder, making them a great choice for practically all fitness levels. If you find a pushup too hard, try doing one on your knees or on an incline for more assistance. If the pushup is too easy, you can move your hands closer together or stagger your hands for a more challenging form of the move.


Michaels also said she likes yoga poses like down dog for strengthening her arms and back.

caption
Downward-facing dog or “down dog” is a common yoga pose.
source
Joe Daunt/Business Insider

Although yoga can be brushed aside as an exercise that only improves your flexiblity and mobility, Michaels says it also helps keep her strong. She told INSIDER she especially likes poses like down dog, which involves inverting your body into a triangle shape and using your back and shoulder muscles to hold yourself in place.

Down dog, combined with a plank, offers a great abdominal and arm workout, according to Michaels. Fortunately, in typical yoga practices, these two moves are often done back-to-back.


Chaturanga is another yoga pose Michaels suggests.

caption
A woman does chaturanga pose during yoga class.
source
Joe Raedle/GettyImages

Chaturanga may appear to be a simple and easy yoga pose, but in reality, the move is quite difficult to master.

That’s because it involves pushing your body forward from a plank pose so your chest is facing upward and in front of your shoulders. At the same time, the tops of your thighs should hover over the ground, rather than resting down, and your core should stay tight.

When done correctly, chaturanga can tone the back, shoulders, triceps, and abs all at once.


Michaels also recommended pullups or chin-ups.

caption
Pullups aren’t easy, but luckily they can be modified.
source
Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

If you’re ready to throw in the flag because you’re certain you can’t do a chin-up or pullup, Michaels has a solution for you.

“These exercises can be modified with resistance bands for assistance,” she said.

To use a resistance band to modify your pullup, first loop it around the pullup bar. Then, bend one of your legs and rest your knee in the looped band. From the position, you can do a pullup or chin-up more easily.


Dumbbell rows are one of Michaels’ go-to functional exercises.

caption
This exercise creates a pushing and pulling motion.
source
Shutterstock/martinmark

“I like to look at muscles’ functions and choose exercises based on that,” Michaels told INSIDER.

Dumbbell rows fit into this philosophy because they create a pulling and pushing motion, something your arms do on a daily basis. Doing this exercise will strengthen and tone your triceps, upper back, and lower back.

To do a dumbbell row, grab two moderately heavy dumbbells and put one knee on a bench. Your other leg extends to the side for stability. While holding the dumbbell in the hand opposite of your knee, focus on lifting that elbow up and back with control.

If you don’t have a bench, you can do a bent over dumbbell row, where you hinge at your hips and do the same motion.

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