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How a young doctor ended up in charge of a makeshift morgue in a Brooks Brothers store on 9/11

How a young doctor ended up in charge of a makeshift morgue in a Brooks Brothers store on 9/11

Sandeep Jauhar revisits the Brooks Brothers store for the first time since September 11, 2001.

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Sandeep Jauhar revisits the Brooks Brothers store for the first time since September 11, 2001.
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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider
  • Sandeep Jauhar was part of a group of doctors and nurses from Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan who headed downtown to help on September 11, 2001.
  • A police officer asked the 32-year-old cardiologist to help at a makeshift morgue in the Brooks Brothers store located across the street from Ground Zero.
  • After several other doctors left the scene, Jauhar was surprised to be put in charge of the morgue for almost an hour.
  • He told his story on Business Insider’s “Household Name” podcast.

Sandeep Jauhar started September 11, 2001 with his wife at her obstetrician. While at the doctor’s office, the 32-year-old cardiologist saw the news of the first plane hitting the World Trade Center.

At first, Jauhar didn’t think much of it.

“I just thought it was a terrible thing that happened,” Jauhar said on the latest episode of Business Insider’s Household Name podcast. “I did not think we had to get involved.”

Jauhar, who had just finished his medical residency and was beginning a cardiology fellowship at Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan, was in the cab on his way to work when he heard the report of a second plane hitting the World Trade Center.

It was then he realized what was happening was not normal.

When Jauhar got to the emergency room of the hospital, he found out that the first of the Twin Towers had come down. He did not believe it until he looked out the window and saw only one building standing, surrounded by a cloud of smoke.

With all hands on deck at the hospital, the doctors and nurses waited for patients to arrive to the trauma center. But communication with first responders downtown was poor and no patients were coming, Jauhar said.

Alongside a group of nurses and doctors, Jauhar volunteered to go down in an ambulance to Ground Zero.

“I didn’t know what to expect,” Jauhar said. As the contingent made their way to the site, the color changed from perfectly sunny in Midtown to dark and smoky as they got closer.

“This is Beirut,” Jauhar said about that day. “This is insane that this is actually NYC.”

Sandeep Jauhar sits in the Brooks Brothers that had served as a makeshift morgue after 9/11. In the background, a photo shows what the store looked like that day.

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Sandeep Jauhar sits in the Brooks Brothers that had served as a makeshift morgue after 9/11. In the background, a photo shows what the store looked like that day.
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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

When Jauhar and the group of doctors and nurses from Bellevue arrived, Jauhar expected to see more injured.

“I blurted out ‘Where are the patients?’,” Jauhar said. “And someone said ‘They’re all dead.’”

Despite his wife not wanting him to go back to Ground Zero the next day, Jauhar returned to the scene to keep helping.

When he arrived, a cop asked Jauhar for help in a makeshift morgue. It was set up in the Brooks Brothers across the street from Ground Zero. He followed the cop over to the morgue located in the high-end retail clothing store.

Not long after arriving and assessing the scene, Jauhar was horrified to realize that he was the most senior doctor in the room. With no idea what to do, he described the thought of possibly being called on to run the morgue as “disturbing.”

But as other doctors began to step out and leave, Jauhar was put in charge for almost an hour. Medical school didn’t prepare him for this scenario.

“I didn’t want to be in charge,” Jauhar said on “Household Name.” “I’m a cardiologist. I don’t relish emergencies. This was so beyond anything I was trained to do.”

Listen to the full episode:

As he began to feel physically sick and nauseous looking at severed bodies, Jauhar ended up leaving the makeshift morgue.

He didn’t go back to help out at Ground Zero the next day, nor did he want to read anything about 9/11. Other than visiting the 9/11 Memorial, Jauhar has sought to keep that day in the corner of his mind so that he didn’t have to talk or think about it.

“I would have stayed if I could have done it,” Jauhar said. “It was such an emotionally troubling thing that I just had to get away. It’s impossible to not have emotions in that situation.”

You can listen to Jauhar’s full story on the latest episode of Business Insider’s Household Name here. Subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you listen.

Why people are still getting sick 17 years after 9/11

Why people are still getting sick 17 years after 9/11

The remaining tower of New York's World Trade Center, Tower 2, dissolves in a cloud of dust and debris about a half hour after the first twin tower collapsed September 11, 2001.

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The remaining tower of New York’s World Trade Center, Tower 2, dissolves in a cloud of dust and debris about a half hour after the first twin tower collapsed September 11, 2001.
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Reuters/Ray Stubblebine
  • First responders and survivors of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks are still feeling the effects on their health.
  • As time has passed, more lasting health conditions seem to be linked to the 2001 attack.
  • But connecting health problems and 9/11 is no small feat. Researchers are still trying to pin down the association between the attacks and conditions like cancer, respiratory issues, and other ailments.

Esther Regelson lived two blocks south of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.

She was there when the towers collapsed, spewing dust that was filled with hundreds of carcinogenic substances, including jet fuel, asbestos, lead, mercury, and fibrous gas.

Several months later, she noticed that she was having a harder time breathing. Regelson had lived with asthma since she was a child, but this felt different.

She went to a clinic, and found out that she had only 49% lung capacity.

“They were saying it was unheard of that I was as functional as I was,” she told Business Insider in a 2016 interview.

Regelson, who still lived in the same apartment over 15 years later, also dealt with acid reflux and had bouts of chronic bronchitis for a while.

She’s not the only one with these conditions – those responding to the attack and living in the area were exposed to a lot of carcinogenic substances, and the effects are still being felt 17 years later. As time has passed, more lasting health conditions, including cancer, seem to be linked to the 2001 attack.

For example, Marcy Borders, the subject of an iconic photo in which she was shown covered in dust after the attack, died of stomach cancer in August 2015. She was one of thousands who have reported cancer cases linked with the aftermath of the terror attacks.

The World Trade Center Health Program, a federal program designed to treat those living with conditions that have a connection to 9/11, was put into effect in 2011. It covers trauma-related injuries, disorders related to breathing and digestion, mental health conditions, and a long list of more than 50 cancers that have been connected to the dust and rubble of 9/11. The program was renewed in 2015 as part of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act.

Who was affected

The health program covers two groups: the survivors who lived, studied, or worked in the area, and the responders – firefighters, police officers, construction workers, and others who came to help and clear out the dust-coated area. As of March 2018, more than 86,000 people had registered through the health program.

Because of the program, those patients don’t have to pay anything out of pocket for their medical care. Before the law was put in place, however, people incurred massive amounts of medical debt as they confronted 9/11-related illnesses. But not all survivors – in particular, residents – have sought out the proper care.

“Unfortunately a lot of people who live and work in this neighborhood don’t put two and two together,” Regelson said. “They don’t realize the program is for them – it’s not just for first responders not getting help.”

Kimberly Flynn, director of the 9/11 Environmental Action group, which works to connect residents to the health program, described the problem this way in 2016: “There are a lot of people who should be in this program who are not. That’s because they moved on.”

A group of firefighters walk amid rubble near the base of the destroyed south tower of the World Trade Center in New York September 11, 2001.

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A group of firefighters walk amid rubble near the base of the destroyed south tower of the World Trade Center in New York September 11, 2001.
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Reuters/Peter Morgan

Finding the medical evidence

Pinning down the link between health problems and 9/11 is no small feat. Researchers are still trying to pin down the association between the attacks and conditions like cancer, respiratory issues, and other ailments. That can be hard to prove because the events are just one factor of many when it comes to conditions like cancer.

A 2012 study in the Journal of the American Medical Association looked at 55,000 New Yorkers that had enrolled in the World Trade Center Health Registry. That study found that for cancer, “no significant associations were observed with intensity of World Trade Center exposures,” though the researchers noted that more follow up for cancers that take a longer time to show up are needed. They noted that “the presence of carcinogenic agents raises the possibility that exposure to the WTC environment could eventually lead to cancers.”

The World Trade Center Health Program has different criteria for what can be linked to 9/11, but it still requires some proof or a pattern. And those with conditions that could possibly relate to 9/11 but haven’t had a proven link might not get the care they need. Flynn said there can be a major time gap between when doctors first see a patient with a certain problem and the time at which that condition gets added to the health program’s coverage.

“It’s essential that it exists. It provides expert care for a wide range of conditions,” she said of the program. “But people are still getting sick with conditions that may not be added for some time because there’s not sufficient evidence.”

The coming years

The World Trade Center Health Program will be in place until 2090.

A lot is still unknown about how the lasting health effects of 9/11 will affect people in the coming decades. For example, cancers might start to become more frequent a few more years down the line. The health program’s enrollment has steadily been rising since it opened, with a few hundred more responders and survivors joining each month.

Ideally, by monitoring this group, doctors and health officials can get a better idea of what’s to come for those who were exposed to toxic dust during and after 9/11.

“Hopefully the science can direct us to what these things do to people,” Regelson said.

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