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Inside Flatiron Health’s swanky, new NYC headquarters, where the cold brew coffee flows and the conference rooms give off a serious living room vibe

Inside Flatiron Health’s swanky, new NYC headquarters, where the cold brew coffee flows and the conference rooms give off a serious living room vibe

Flatiron Health's new Manhattan offices.

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Flatiron Health’s new Manhattan offices.
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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

It’s been a big year for Flatiron Health.

The New York-based cancer technology company in February got acquired by Roche in a $1.9 billion deal.

A few months later, the company moved into its new 108,000 square-foot office space at One Soho Square, a space that’s almost twice the size of its former office at 200 Fifth Ave.

Business Insider popped in to the new location in July to get a feel for the space and observe some of the demonstrations from a recent Hackathon event.

Here’s a look at the company’s new headquarters.


Our tour of the Flatiron headquarters started on the 5th floor. We were immediately greeted by a large open area with a pantry stocked with snacks, a Rise cold brew tap, and fridge space.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

The majority of the 5th floor is common space so when it’s lunchtime (catered in daily), employees can have space to eat. On the day we visited, we got to reap the benefits of an Insomnia Cookies snack delivery.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

The rest of the floor, called the Everyone@ space, is filled with couches and chairs where employees can work and also gather for events.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

The space can fit between 650-700 people for large company-wide meetings. Flatiron collects clinical data about cancer patients — such as what medications patients have taken and how they have responded to them— so it employs a lot of engineers and people with medical backgrounds.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

To make sure everyone can see the presenter, Flatiron built out a stage at the front of the space.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

On the opposite side of the floor from the pantry sits what Rosie Hobbs, senior manager of office operations at Flatiron, calls the “Hydration Station,” filled with different beverages.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

Included among that is a tabletop version of the Bevi water machine, which serves different flavors of sparkling and still water. “I always want to pilot everything,” Hobbs said.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

Flatiron currently has 500 employees, but has plans to bring that headcount up to 900 spread out over five floors in the building. Hobbs said employees use the stairwells to get from meeting to meeting, and meeting rooms are alphabetized on each floor to ensure no one gets lost.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

When we visited in July, three floors had been completed, while a fourth and a fifth were still in the works.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

Down on another floor, Flatiron has more desks as well as booths for one-on-one meetings, which are a big part of the company’s culture.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

Bigger meeting spaces have a different feel as well. Some have a standard table and video screen…

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

… while others feel more like a living room.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

The office also has bigger meeting spaces complete with white boards and boxes stuffed with laptop adapters of all shapes and sizes.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

When we made our way back up to the 5th floor, the Hackathon was in full swing. Flatiron employees presented everything from small tweaks to the company’s cancer data product to finding new ways to get employees to volunteer.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

The company’s board room is named “Possibilities” after the book written about CEO Nat Turner’s cousin, who was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia at a young age.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

Source: Business Insider


Even though the meeting room is only five floors up, Flatiron employees have a good view of the Empire State Building.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

As we headed out, we noted the foyer’s fun geometric rugs, plants, and comfy-looking couches.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

We also noticed that Flatiron’s reception area highlighted the company’s mission: “To improve lives by learning from the experience of every cancer patient.”

Flatiron Health's new Manhattan offices.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

Flatiron’s logo was displayed clearly as well.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

Nestled on the streets of New York’s SoHo neighborhood, Flatiron’s new offices might no longer be in the Flatiron District, but it seems to fit in all the same.

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Hollis Johnson/Business Insider
A 32-year-old CEO who sold his company for $1.9 billion explains why fundraising isn’t a business plan

A 32-year-old CEO who sold his company for $1.9 billion explains why fundraising isn’t a business plan

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Saskia Uppenkamp
  • At 32, Nat Turner has already sold one company to Google for more than $70 million, and sold a second to pharmaceutical giant Roche for $1.9 billion.
  • Turner and his cofounder Zach Weinberg launched Flatiron Health, a cancer technology company, in 2012.
  • The initial plan was to raise another funding round. Flatiron got as far as receiving term sheets, but ultimately decided to strike a deal with Roche, which had previously been an investor.
  • The self-described “serial entrepreneurs” are staying on after the acquisition. “This is not a standard company for us,” Turner told Business Insider.

Nat Turner is quick to point out that this didn’t happen overnight.

Turner’s the CEO of Flatiron Health, a company that the Swiss pharmaceutical giant Roche on Thursday agreed to pay $1.9 billion for, valuing the company at $2.1 billion. It’s the second major acquisition for the serial entrepreneur and his cofounder Zach Weinberg, whose last company sold to Google in 2010 for more than $70 million.

Flatiron, which is based in New York, collects clinical data about cancer patients – such as what medications patients have taken and how they have responded to them.

With that information, such as details on what medications patients have taken and how they have responded to them over the course of treatment, the hope is that healthcare professionals can have a better idea of how cancer drugs work in the “real world” in hospitals and cancer centers, as opposed to during clinical trials.

How fundraising plans and term sheets turned into an acquisition

The Roche Group is made up of a number of different businesses, spanning from diagnostics to cancer drug development. Roche’s Genentech arm had been one of Flatiron’s early clients back in 2013, Turner said. Then toward the end of 2015, Roche led the company’s $175 million Series C.

Around September 2017, Flatiron began considering raising another funding round to take advantage of money that’s been pouring into healthcare, while at the same time having the chance to do some acquisitions and otherwise grow the company.

“It was an attractive time,” Turner told Business Insider. The company even received a few term sheets.

“What we really needed – and so we started thinking of strategic investing rounds and other stuff – was access to certain talent, access to a global platform that allowed us to internationalize our products, both with cancer centers and with pharma companies and regulators,” Turner said. “We needed access to a much broader dataset in terms of genomic data and things like that.”

That’s when Flatiron started having more conversations with Roche Pharmaceuticals CEO Dan O’Day, who’s a member of Flatiron’s board. In the end, going the acquisition route made more sense.

“They just brought much more to the table than just more budget,” Turner said. “While that’s part of it, just like the funding round would have allowed, we got a lot more things from it.”

Flatiron works with cancer doctors, researchers, and pharma companies through its technology, so there were some non-negotiable aspects to the deal with Roche. That included keeping the door open for Flatiron to keep working with other drugmakers and treating Flatiron as a separate legal entity so that proprietary information wouldn’t be transferred out.

‘Not a standard company’

After selling their last company to Google, Turner and Weinberg got restless. A year in, the two started thinking about building a company that would eventually become Flatiron in 2012.

This time, Turner and Weinberg are staying on.

“We are definitely serial entrepreneurs, but this is not a standard company for us,” Turner said.

That wouldn’t be the case if the acquisition played out the way their last one did, where it was fully integrated into Google. Because Flatiron will operate as a separate entity, the duo can continue to build it up.

“Zach and I need our autonomy to build things the way we want to build them,” Turner said. “And obviously the proof is in the pudding, we’ll prove it once we’re there, but we’re excited to continue the mission and we’re going to do it.”

Turner’s advice for entrepreneurs working to get to this point has almost nothing to with reaching a deal.

“We never built Flatiron to be acquired. We always say, you don’t build businesses to be sold, you build businesses to be purchased, meaning build a business first and foremost,” Turner. ” I don’t think people should be thinking about how to sell their company, they should build a business for the sake of it and for its own purpose.”

Should someone want to buy it and it’s the right time to sell, then that works out.

He added: “Fundraising’s not a business model.”

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