6010-3724505 admin@juzlab.net
0 Items
‘Demon Chef’ Alvin Leung opens restaurant in Malaysia

‘Demon Chef’ Alvin Leung opens restaurant in Malaysia

Known simply by his moniker “demon chef” Alvin Leung is a pivotal figure in Hong Kong’s culinary landscape. Leung first made a name for himself with his flagship restaurant Bo Innovation, which has retained three Michelin stars since 2013.

There, Leung popularised his signature X-Treme Chinese cuisine, throwing out all the rulebooks to create modern, inventive Oriental food. Leung is also a familiar face on MasterChef Canada, where he serves as a judge.

Now – for the first time ever – Malaysia will have an association with the famed chef through his partnership with Fuhu Restaurant & Bar, the new vibe dining concept by Zouk Group set to open tomorrow at Resorts World Genting.

“The launch of FUHU Restaurant & Bar is a monumental occasion for Zouk Group, as it marks our first foray into F&B,” says Andrew Li, chief executive officer of Zouk Group.

Leung's restaurant in Malaysia will feature a modern take on classic Chinese cuisine.

Leung’s restaurant in Malaysia will feature a modern take on classic Chinese cuisine.

“We are committed to providing the best, and there is no better way to mark this milestone than to partner a culinary mastermind such as Alvin Leung.”

Leung’s involvement is certain to inspire innovation and a bold, sanguine direction for Fuhu, which will feature a modern spin on classic Asian fare.

Menu items to look out for include Fuhu roasted duck, Boston lobster noodles, Szechuan-style hot & sour lobster soup and fried chicken and waffle.

Fuhu seats up to 150 diners and will feature an interplay of dining, nightlife and music, the latter of which the Zouk Group is most well-known for.

Aesthetically, the restaurant is designed to inspire wonder and joy, with a Chinese apothecary themed entrance, gargantuan sakura tree and floor-to-ceiling mural by grafitti artist Kenji Chai taking centrestage.

The next time you’re on an AirAsia flight, eat a burger

The next time you’re on an AirAsia flight, eat a burger

AirAsia has joined the fight to end AIDS with the creation of a new red-hot dish. The airline and Santan have teamed up with (RED) to create the INSPI(RED) Burger, a special in-flight meal.

The burger features a chicken patty infused with fish sauce, kaffir lime leaves and lemongrass, topped with zesty green chilli mayonnaise, shredded purple cabbage and tomato on a red beetroot bun.

The dish is created by New York-based (RED) chef ambassador Hong Thaimee, who drew inspiration from her Northern Thai roots to deliver an East-meets-West culinary experience.

“It’s not only a delicious option for passengers, it brings real awareness to the AIDS fight and helps raise critical funds to finance HIV/AIDS programmes in Asean,” said (RED) chief operating officer Jennifer Lotito.

AirAsia Group brand head Rudy Khaw said the partnership is an “ideal marriage of two Asean personalities in support of the region”.
Guests are encouraged to pre-book the meal on airasia.com.

For every INSPI(RED) Burger sold, 10% of the proceeds will go to the global fund to support HIV/AIDS testing, counselling, treatment and prevention programmes in the region.

AirAsia has also created a special line of co-branded (AirAsia)RED inflight merchandise such as a remix of the iconic AirAsia cap and an aircraft model. For each item sold, US$2 (RM8.27) will be donated to the global fund.

(RED) is a licensed brand that seeks to engage the private sector in raising awareness and funds to help eliminate HIV/AIDS in Africa.

In separate developments, AirAsia recently announced an expanded cooperative marketing agreement with Tourism Western Australia.

The agreement will see joint marketing campaigns developed to promote affordable flights to Western Australia.

Bugs up: Cape Town restaurant serves insect menu

Bugs up: Cape Town restaurant serves insect menu

A dish of Basil Pesto Taglietelle, made with ground Black Soldier Fly larvae, and garnished with Mealworms, at Gourmet Grubb, a food stand run by chef Mario Barnard (not visible) specialising in using insects in cuisine, in Cape Town July 17, 2019. — AFP pic
A dish of Basil Pesto Taglietelle, made with ground Black Soldier Fly larvae, and garnished with Mealworms, at Gourmet Grubb, a food stand run by chef Mario Barnard (not visible) specialising in using insects in cuisine, in Cape Town July 17, 2019. — AFP pic

CAPE TOWN, July 25 ― Mopane worms are a traditional snack in South Africa, but a Cape Town restaurant is set to crawl into the history books as the first to serve a full menu of bug-infused delicacies.

The Insect Experience, which opened its doors this month, is offering an alternative food source to the city’s mainstream culinary experience.

The restaurant was opened by Gourmet Grub, a company that has already introduced Cape Town to dairy-free ice cream made from insect milk.

Co-founder and head of product development Leah Bessa has been investigating insects as a viable protein substitute.

“In general insects are really high in protein and fat, comparable to red meat in their protein and fat content. The insects we use, the black soldier fly larvae, are much higher in zinc, iron and calcium than beef,” she said.

According to Bessa, the insects are also high in dietary fibre and have no carbohydrate value.

The bugs are bred by two local farmers and delivered straight to the restaurant.

Mealworms and mopane worms are some of the creepy-crawlies that chef Mario Barnard has included in his dishes.

Mario Barnard, chef at Gourmet Grubb, works at his food stand specialising in using insects in cuisine in Cape Town July 17, 2019. — AFP pic
Mario Barnard, chef at Gourmet Grubb, works at his food stand specialising in using insects in cuisine in Cape Town July 17, 2019. — AFP pic

In 2015, he went to Thailand and for the first time experienced dishes made with tarantulas and scorpions.

“I knew then that I wanted to hide insects in food, incorporated into little gourmet dishes, to introduce to South Africans,” Barnard said.

The restaurant serves mopane worm polenta fries, and black fly larvae chickpea croquettes paired with a mopane hummus and topped off with a sprinkle of dried mealworms.

For dessert, it offers a deep-fried dark chocolate black fly larvae ice cream.

“I chose these dishes for introducing insects to people because they’re already familiar with them ― everyone knows polenta fries and croquettes,” he said.

One customer told AFP: “It’s delicious, it’s flavourful and spicy, it’s everything you want in food.” ― AFP

Where to get the best D24 and Black Thorn durians in Malaysia

Where to get the best D24 and Black Thorn durians in Malaysia

The recent second edition of the Bangi Golf Resort World Durian Championship: Malaysia Edition saw more than 50 durians fighting it out for the top spots in categories like Musang King, Black Thorn, registered clone and D24.

Although there were some repeat winners – Eric Chan’s Dulai Fruits once again nabbed the prize for best Musang King and Tekka, there were also some new faces. (Go here for last year’s winners: 2018’s top 5 durians in Malaysia and where to find them).

Here are the two new winners of the best D24 and Black Thorn in Malaysia in 2019.


Winner: Sg Baong Jawi Durian Farm
Category: Black Thorn

Leow Cheok Kiang is a name that is likely to ring a bell in durian circles, where he is a venerated figure.

Leow is a 60-something Penang farmer who has three farms in Seberang Perai. He is also the person responsible for registering the vaunted (and now very expensive) Black Thorn clone in Malaysia.

Leow has won numerous competitions in Penang for his Black Thorn. This is his first time entering a KL competition. Photo: Pow Chiok

“Mr Leow started farming with his father when he was seven, so he has a well-established routine of taking care of his trees. If the tree is healthy, he knows that the fruit will be of good quality. So this is the fundamental idea that he follows to this day,” says Pow Chiok, Leow’s good friend and spokesperson.

Pow was instrumental in getting Leow to participate in the competition and even went to the extent of collecting fruits from Leow’s farm (and a few other Penang farms) and driving down to Bangi on the day of the competition to deliver them to the organisers.

Interestingly, while Leow has won numerous awards in Penang for his Black Thorn, he has never entered a durian competition anywhere else. His entry in the Bangi durian competition marks his maiden foray in a KL competition.

“This is the first time he is participating in this competition and Penang people are very proud of him because it just proves that his Black Thorn is one of the top, premium grade durians in Malaysia right now,” says a jubilant Pow.

Leow first discovered Black Thorn at a friend’s farm and took cuttings from the tree. His oldest Black Thorn durian tree is now over 50 years old and was originally a kampung durian tree which he grafted 35 years ago with the Black Thorn clone; this is also the tree that has yielded award-winning fruit.

Also read: ‘Durian Whisky’ is Malaysian-made, and not actually whisky

Leow is responsible for registering the Black Thorn clone in Malaysia.

Leow first discovered Black Thorn at a friend’s farm and took cuttings from the tree.

As mature Black Thorn trees tend to yield better fruits, it is little wonder that Leow’s decades-old trees have produced creamy, sensationally delicious results.

Although Leow’s Black Thorn has collected accolades aplenty, he doesn’t export his fruit overseas; instead every year during durian season, he sells his fruit at a fruit stall in Sungai Jawi, Penang.

“His fruit stall is actually a preferred destination – every day tourists in Penang will flock to his stall.

“And he keeps his prices consistent, about RM60 to RM65 per kg throughout the season – he never raises prices even though others may be selling it for a higher price.

“And even though he only produces fruit for domestic consumption – his fruits get bought up every day and he often doesn’t have enough,” says Pow.


Where to taste the durian (until end of July only):

Durian stall (look for signs that say Ochee champion)
Jalan Jawi Jaya 2
Taman Jawi Jaya
14200 Sungai Jawi
Penang

<![CDATA[
/**/
]]>


Winner: Eco Valley Organic Durian Farm
Category: Best D24

Ocean Chua and his family had long been avid consumers of durian or as he puts it: “My whole family is crazy about durians – my wife, mother and mother-in-law can eat it three times a day from morning to night”.

Chua started the organic durian farm
with his friends so they could produce ‘cleaner’
durians. Photo: Ocean Chua

So one day, he and his friends decided to start their own organic durian farm in a remote part of Bukit Tinggi, Pahang.

The 30-acre farm is surrounded by the verdant greens of the Taman Negara forest reserve and has around 700 durian trees as well as rambutan, papaya, banana and mangosteen trees.

“We are an organic farm, so we make use of our natural environment. Like the fertiliser that we use is a combination of fermented seaweed as well as fallen leaves/grass which are mixed with soil and left to ferment. We treat the earth, not just the tree,” says Chua.

As a result of their careful ministrations, the soil on Chua’s farm now has a pH value of 6.5, so it is almost neutral.

In contrast, most commercial durian farms that use chemical fertilisers have more acidic soil with a pH value of around 4.5 to 5.

The farm also uses pristine water from a waterfall nearby to irrigate the trees on the farm, lending to its wholesome appeal.

Also read: How to choose a durian, according to durian experts

The river source that irrigates Chua’s farm. Photo: Ocean Chua

Pictures from the farm show a host of natural inhabitants from ladybirds to worms and bees. It is this natural ecosystem that Chua thinks has contributed to his creamy, rich D24 durians.

Although the durians on Chua’s farm are mostly intended for him and his friends, come durian season, the friends run a durian stall in Metro Pudu and sell their farm’s yield until supply runs out.

Asked about their win, Chua says this is testament to the notion that very good durian fruits can be borne out of organic farming practices.

“This affirmation is our motivation to continue preserving nature and cultivating healthy durians for the next generation. We also hope the award can send a message to other farmers that good durians can be produced without the aid of chemical fertilisers or pesticides,” he says.


Where to taste the durian (until end of August/supply runs out):

Eco Valley Organic Durian (KL)
40-G, Jalan Metro Pudu 2,
Off Jalan Yew
Fraser Business Park
55100 Kuala Lumpur

A single apple could harbor as much as 100 million bacteria, but it’s probably a good thing

A single apple could harbor as much as 100 million bacteria, but it’s probably a good thing

An apple a day enhances the diversity of your gut biome to keep the doctor away.

caption
An apple a day enhances the diversity of your gut biome to keep the doctor away.
source
Valery Sharifulin / Getty
  • One apple could contain as much as 100 million bacteria.
  • But you’ll need to eat the core to get the majority of it. If you throw the middle away, the number drops to 10 million.
  • But it’s actually a good thing to consume this bacteria, according to scientists, because it enhances the diversity of your gut biome.
  • Essentially, the more variety of bacteria in your gut, the less likely it is for one to be dominant enough for you to get sick.
  • “The microbiome and antioxidant profiles of fresh produce may one day become standard nutritional information, displayed alongside macronutrients, vitamins and minerals to guide consumers,” said Birgit Wasserman, the lead author of the study.
  • Visit INSIDER’s homepage for more stories.

Finding out your food is covered in bacteria might make you feel a bit queasy. But in the case of apples, it’s probably a good thing.

According to a new study, published in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology, a single apple can harbor as much as 100 million bacteria, and organic ones carry a much more diverse colony.

Researchers from the Graz University of Technology in Austria found that a regular 240g apple contains roughly 100 million bacteria, which you will consume if you eat the core. But if you discard the middle part, the number falls to 10 million.

“The bacteria, fungi and viruses in our food transiently colonize our gut,” said senior author of the study Gabriele Berg. “Cooking kills most of these, so raw fruit and veg are particularly important sources of gut microbes.”

He said consuming foods with a diverse and distinct bacterial community is good for our gut health, because it limits the growth of one species getting out of hand. In other words, the more variety, the less likely it is that one will be dominant enough for you to get sick.

Read more: You might be consuming a credit card’s worth of plastic every week from your food

He added that organic apples were superior when it came to the type of bacteria present.

Escherichia-Shigella – a group of bacteria that includes known pathogens – was found in most of the conventional apple samples, but none from organic apples,” he said. “For beneficial Lactobacilli – of probiotic fame – the reverse was true.”

Organic apples also had more Methylobacterium, which are known for enhancing the flavor of strawberry.

“The microbiome and antioxidant profiles of fresh produce may one day become standard nutritional information, displayed alongside macronutrients, vitamins and minerals to guide consumers,” said Birgit Wasserman, the lead author of the study.

“Here, a key step will be to confirm to what extent diversity in the food microbiome translates to gut microbial diversity and improved health outcomes.”

Pin It on Pinterest