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Dispensed: Oscar’s first moves in Medicare Advantage, uBiome’s new board members, and Novartis’ CEO’s commitment to wearing jeans

Dispensed: Oscar’s first moves in Medicare Advantage, uBiome’s new board members, and Novartis’ CEO’s commitment to wearing jeans

The microbiome testing company uBiome has come under scrutiny after an FBI raid.

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The microbiome testing company uBiome has come under scrutiny after an FBI raid.
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Hollis Johnson / Business Insider

Hello,

Welcome to a warm-weather edition of Dispensed, in which I am already plotting how I can spend as little time in the heat as possible this weekend.

Before we jump in, I wanted to first let you all know that our colleague Erin Brodwin is getting married this weekend, and we couldn’t be more excited for her! If you see her sometime in the next few months be sure to bring her cake and say congrats!

Are you new to our newsletter? You can sign up for Dispensed here.

Anyway, back to business. First up, a few updates on uBiome. If you recall, last week the company laid off half of its staff – including the lab director, which meant the company had to stop running its only test. Well, eight days later, the same lab director has been brought back on, and uBiome told customers that the tests are back to running.

Also-the company has hired two new board members, one a retired bankruptcy lawyer, the other a professional with a background in restructuring. It’ll be curious to see where the company goes from here, now that it has new management, a new board, and half the staff.

Just catching up on uBiome? You can find more of our coverage of the troubled startup here.

Elsewhere, Oscar Health revealed where it plans to set up Medicare Advantage plans in 2020. It’s starting with NYC through a partnership with Bronx-based Montefiore, as well as partnerships with doctor groups and hospitals in the Houston area.

Folks took to Twitter with some interesting reactions to the news, so I thought I’d share some of them here and here.

Emma Court took a look at the early work Sanofi’s recently appointed Chief Digital Officer Ameet Nathwani is working on.

Using apps to treat diseases could be the future of healthcare. The first chief digital officer at pharma giant Sanofi told us his strategy for navigating the promises and pitfalls.

  • French drugmaker Sanofi recently appointed Chief Medical Officer Ameet Nathwani as its chief digital officer.
  • The pharma industry is increasingly hiring chief digital officers as it seeks to make better use of technologies like artificial intelligence in its business.
  • But Nathwani says that the pharmaceutical industry also needs to be on high alert around issues of bias, privacy, and cybersecurity, “because this black box scenario isn’t going to be sustainable.”
  • Nathwani told Business Insider Sanofi has developed policies as part of that, including establishing oversight of the tech and putting checks in place.

Emma also spoke with Novartis CEO Vas Narasimhan after the company presented earnings on Thursday. Among the things they discussed: Narashimhan’s commitment to wearing jeans in the office. (see photo)

Novartis CEO Vas Narasimhan.

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Novartis CEO Vas Narasimhan.
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Novartis

Pharma giant Novartis has been on a tear. CEO Vas Narasimhan told us how wearing jeans to work is helping transform the Swiss company.

  • Vas Narasimhan took the reins at Novartis early last year and has pushed to transform the Swiss drug giant into a cutting-edge, tech-savvy company.
  • And it’s been working, Narasimhan told Business Insider in a Thursday interview, pointing to strong second-quarter financial results reported that day.
  • Culture has been a big push at Novartis, which the Swiss drug giant tracks via tech platforms and plenty of data.
  • “I’d like to believe over time we’ll keep showing that culture drives performance and culture drives innovation,” Narasimhan said. “And the cultural transformation of Novartis will keep us at the cutting edge for years to come.”

When it comes to Novartis’ strategy, (in particular its potential acquisitions going forward), one sentence in particular in Emma’s conversation with Narasimhan stuck out: “I aspire for us to target on the order of 5% of our market cap in M&A, focused in either building therapeutic area depth or building out new technology platforms.” Read more from the conversation.

Elsewhere in conversation with BI, Emma and I had some more dispatches from our conversation with GV.

Something to keep an eye out for going into the end of July – the Livongo IPO is upon us. On Monday, the company updated its IPO filing to say that it’s seeking to raise more than $200 million in its initial public offering. It’s looking for a valuation of $2.1 billion to $2.4 billion. Here’s a look at the investors who stand to benefit the most from the digital health company going public.

I’ll leave you with one more great read, from one of our reporters on the video team here. Benji Jones took a look at the cost of being transgender in the US. As you might imagine, there are a lot of hidden costs, especially when it comes to medical procedures. Watch more of the story here.

That’s all for this week! In the meantime, send thoughts, tips, and tricks to surviving a heat wave to the healthcare team at healthcare@businessinsider.com. You can reach me directly at lramsey@businessinsider.com.

– Lydia

Array BioPharma spikes more than 50% after Pfizer shells out $11 billion for the cancer-drug developer

Array BioPharma spikes more than 50% after Pfizer shells out $11 billion for the cancer-drug developer

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Matthew Horwood/Getty Images
  • Pfizer agreed to purchase Array BioPharma for $11 billion.
  • Array Biopharma specializes in the development and commercialization of drugs to treat cancer and other high burden diseases.
  • There have been several large healthcare acquisitions in 2019 focused on drugs to treat cancer.

Array BioPharma rose more than 50% before the opening bell on Monday after Pfizer offered $11 billion to buy the biotechnology company.

Pfizer is offering $48 a share for Array, which represents around a 62% premium from its closing price on Friday. The deal is expected to be closed in the second half of 2019, and will first to appear in earnings in 2022. The merger has been approved by the boards of both companies. Pfizer’s share price remained relatively flat in pre-market trading.

Pfizer’s purchase of Array Biopharma will broaden its access to the specialized cancer drugs. Pfizer purchased Theracon, a rare-disease biotechnology company, earlier this May for $340 million.

“The proposed acquisition of Array strengthens our innovative biopharmaceutical business, is expected to enhance its long-term growth trajectory, and sets the stage to create a potentially industry leading-franchise for colorectal cancer alongside Pfizer’s existing expertise in breast and prostate cancers,” Albert Bourla, chief executive officer of Pfizer, said in a press release on Monday.

This acquisition adds to a series of notable healthcare deals in 2019. In early June, one of Pfizer’s biggest competitors, Merck, paid $773 million for Tilos Therapeutics, a privately-held biotechnology company working on new treatments for cancer.

At the start of the year, Eli Lilly & Co., paid $8 billion to acquire Loxo Oncology, a developer of highly selective medicines for cancer treatments.

Varun Kumar, an analyst Cantor Fitzgerald said the Array deal was good news for oncology companies.

“A common theme associated with these companies has been a clinically de-risked asset in late-stage trials and/or relatively well-defined commercial opportunities in a niche market,” Kumar said.

The push into cancer drugs is part of a broader strategy for Pfizer. In 2018, the pharmaceutical giant sold off billion-dollar brands like Advil, ChapStick and Emergen-Co to focus on more complex medicines like cancer drugs.

Array BioPharma is up more than 200% so far this year.

array stock price

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array stock price
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Markets Insider
Bernie Sanders slams ‘polite f-u’ letters sent by generic drug companies as ‘clearly illegal’ and calls for an investigation

Bernie Sanders slams ‘polite f-u’ letters sent by generic drug companies as ‘clearly illegal’ and calls for an investigation

  • Business Insider reported exclusively last week that generic drug companies’ lawyers allegedly coordinated to send “‘polite f-u’ letters” in response to lawmakers’ inquiries about the spiking prices of their products.
  • Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Representative Elijah Cummings of Maryland just sent the Justice Department a letter urging action against generic drug manufacturers.
  • “In my view, their ‘polite f-u’ letters designed to obstruct our investigation were clearly illegal,” Sanders said in a statement.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Years ago, when the prices of generic drugs like an antibiotic and an asthma medication jumped more than more than 8,000% and 4,000%, respectively, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Representative Elijah Cummings of Maryland began investigating.

They sent letters in fall of 2014 to 14 generic drugmakers, asking about the spiking prices.

But among the generic drugmakers, “the consensus at this point is that the responses will be ‘polite f-u’ letters,” a lawyer for one allegedly reported in an email,

That’s according to an unredacted antitrust complaint being brought by 44 states against generic drugmakers like Mylan, Teva and others that Business Insider reported on exclusively last week.

The unredacted version of an antitrust complaint being brought against 20 drugmakers cites this email from a lawyer for a generic drug company.

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The unredacted version of an antitrust complaint being brought against 20 drugmakers cites this email from a lawyer for a generic drug company.
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44-state unredacted complaint

You can read the full story here, and see the unredacted complaint here.

Sanders and Cummings just wrote to the Justice Department following up about the lawsuit and urging action against generic drug companies.

“In my view, their ‘polite f-u’ letters designed to obstruct our investigation were clearly illegal,” Sanders said in a statement. “The Department of Justice must hold these bad actors accountable to the fullest extent of the law.”

Generic drugmakers allegedly worked together to hike prices

The new letter from Sanders and Cummings refers back to allegations that drugmakers including Teva, the world’s largest generic drugmaker, worked together to hike the prices of many of their drugs. Teva didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment on the lawmakers’ letter.

This claim has been the focus of lawsuits from state attorneys general and an ongoing criminal investigation by the Department of Justice.

These have all brought new scrutiny to generic drugs, which are inexpensive versions of brand name medicines that become available once their patents have expired.

Generics make up the vast majority of prescriptions dispensed in the US, and have been touted as a free-market solution to the US’s high healthcare costs. But the lawsuits allege that drugmakers worked together to bring prices up, instead, hurting patients and taxpayers.

The Justice Department brought charges against two generic drug executives in late 2016, alleging that they had fixed drug prices and manipulated the market for the drugs, but “has not announced any charges against additional generic manufacturers or executives” since, the lawmakers said in the Thursday letter.

That drug company, Heritage, did admit to price fixing for a diabetes medication and agreed to pay a $225,000 criminal penalty and an additional $7 million in a separate civil resolution, the Department of Justice announced late last month.

But the $225,000 penalty is “wholly insufficient to deter future criminal conduct by Heritage or other generic manufacturers,” Sanders and Cummings said in the new letter.

Pointing to the 44-state lawsuit that was recently filed against the generic drugmakers (and is separate from the Department of Justice investigation), the lawmakers urged the Justice Department to investigate and take enforcement actions, if justified.

They also pointed to evidence in the lawsuit suggesting that drugmakers misled the Congressional inquiry, and asked for an investigation into whether Teva and others had violated the law by doing so.

Sanders and Cummings also asked for a briefing by next Friday about any actions the department is taking.

“In response to our document and information requests, these companies gave excuses for raising prices – such as the costs of regulatory compliance, drug shortages, and user fees – that were at best, grossly misleading, and at worst, false statements to Congress,” they said.

Dispensed: A record-breaking approval, what it’s like to work in healthcare, and a call for nominations

Dispensed: A record-breaking approval, what it’s like to work in healthcare, and a call for nominations

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Hello,

Hope you all had a restful start to your summer!

Before we kick into the stories that kept us busy this week, I wanted to put out a call for nominations. This summer, the Business Insider healthcare team will be pulling together an “under 40” list, building on the biotech one we did in 2017 and the health tech one we did in 2018.

This time, given the expansion in our coverage, we’re looking broadly to feature folks who are under 40 and who are transforming healthcare.

We’re interested in featuring rising leaders and entrepreneurs as well as researchers and clinicians, from startups and established firms. Nominees should be able to show how their work is improving healthcare.

So send us your up-and-comers, your rockstars, the new folks on your team that you already know have ideas that will take them places.

You can find the form for nominations here. The deadline for submissions is June 19.

Questions? Hit us up at healthcare@businessinsider.com. Can’t wait to sift through all the great work!

Are you new to our newsletter? You can sign up for Dispensed here.

First, after I sent out last week’s newsletter, the FDA bestowed an approval on the first gene therapy for spinal muscular atrophy, a treatment called Zolgensma that’s made by Novartis. My colleague Emma Court had the inside story on the record-breaking price tag.

A top executive at Swiss drug giant Novartis told us the inside story of the $2.1 million price tag for the most expensive drug in the world

  • The Food and Drug Administration just approved a cutting-edge new treatment from the Swiss drug giant Novartis for a rare genetic disease called spinal muscular atrophy. Priced at $2.1 million, it is the world’s most expensive drug.
  • We spoke with Dave Lennon, the head of the Novartis unit that makes the drug, about how the drugmaker decided on its price tag.
  • Lennon acknowledged the “sticker shock” of this price point but said that because of how expensive this disease was to treat, Zolgensma was actually cost-effective for the US health system.

doctor patient

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

What it’s like to work in healthcare

This week was filled with stories surrounding pay at various healthcare companies. To start, Emma and I looked through regulatory filings to find out what the typical employee at companies like CVS Health, Walgreens, and big biotechs like Biogen and Gilead make. We found a whole lot of variance.

Relatedly, with the help of some great data compiled by our friends at BioPharma Dive I pulled together the 10 biotech companies with the highest median pay in 2018. For some places (namely, Madrigal Pharmaceuticals, which had 15 employees in 2018), the typical pay is as high as $800,000. Check out the rest of the top 10 here.

Elsewhere in healthcare, doctors are burning out twice as fast as other workers. It’s a problem that’s costing the US $4.6 billion each year. Given the World Health Organization’s recent classification of “burnout” as a medical condition, it’s important to think about the physical – as well as economic – toll healthcare professionals are taking on due to being overworked.

Relatedly, Emma and our colleagues on our strategy team mapped out how much everyone makes in a hospital makes, from nurses to surgeons.

Today, the FDA is discussing CBD and other cannabis products at an all-day event. Erin Brodwin has a refresher on what we know (and don’t know) about what CBD does to our body.

Wall Street thinks CBD could be a $16 billion industry by 2025. Here’s what the cannabis compound does to your brain and body.

  • Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a compound in cannabis that doesn’t get you high. It’s surging in popularity, with sellers touting a variety of wellness benefits.
  • CBD is also the active ingredient in an epilepsy drug called Epidiolex.
  • Wall Street thinks the CBD industry could be worth $16 billion by 2025, but that may depend on how federal regulators decide to police it. A hearing on the matter is scheduled for Friday.
  • Here’s what we know about the science of CBD, from its clinical applications to its limitations.

Last week, I sat down with Andreessen Horowitz’s Jorge Conde, and he laid out for me what it’ll take to build a big biotech company that doesn’t serve as simply an acquisition target for pharmaceutical companies looking to beef up their pipelines.

Andreessen Horowitz is famous for backing household names like Facebook and Lyft. Here’s why it thinks it can do the same in biotech.

  • The Andreessen Horowitz general partner Jorge Conde is hoping to invest in biotechs that don’t quickly become acquisition targets for a pharma giant.
  • It’s a counterintuitive idea in an industry that is largely fueled by smaller biotechs getting acquired by large companies looking for the next blockbuster drugs.
  • Instead, Conde is hoping to build “large, iconic companies, much like what’s happened on the technology side,” he said at CNBC’s Healthy Returns conference in New York last week.

And on Thursday, the CEO and chief financial officer at UnitedHealth Group laid out how the healthcare giant plans to turn medical services into a $100 billion business by 2028.

UnitedHealth is already the biggest US health insurer. Now it wants to make going to the doctor its next $100 billion business.

  • UnitedHealth Group expects its healthcare delivery business OptumCare to be a $100 billion-a-year business by 2028.
  • The OptumCare business already employs or works with 38,000 doctors.
  • At the Bernstein Strategic Decisions Conference, analyst Lance Wilkes asked UnitedHealth Group executives how the company plans to get there.
  • The executives said the plan includes building upon the footprint the company established over the last decade.

That’s all for this week! As always, tips? Thoughts on today’s FDA hearing or on Zolgensma’s price tag? You can find me at lramsey@BusinessInsider.com or the whole team at healthcare@businessinsider.com.

And don’t forget to nominate great folks for our leaders under 40 transforming healthcare list!

– Lydia

Doctors and surgeons once again command the highest pay in the US. Here’s how much their coworkers at hospitals make.

Doctors and surgeons once again command the highest pay in the US. Here’s how much their coworkers at hospitals make.

Surgeons earn a median salary of $226,080 a year.

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Surgeons earn a median salary of $226,080 a year.
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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
  • Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Bloomberg recently found that four out of the top five highest-paying jobs in the US are in the medical field.
  • Because physicians and surgeons topped the list (along with general practitioners) with salaries over $200,000, Business Insider looked into the earnings of employees at a typical hospital to see how their coworkers compared.
  • There are 5.2 million people employed by over 6,000 hospitals in the US.
  • Here are the median salaries and number of employed workers for every job at a hospital, from janitors to chief executives.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

It really does pay to be a doctor.

According to a Bloomberg report citing data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), four out of the top five highest-paid jobs in the US are in the medical field, with physicians, surgeons, and general practitioners reporting salaries over $200,000.

But how do their coworkers fare?

Business Insider has taken a look at hospitals, which are a major part of the giant US healthcare industry, with spending on the sector as a whole set to reach nearly 20% of the US economy.

Hospitals have long been a big employer, and it’s on the rise, US Bureau of Labor Statistics figures show, with hospitals employing 5.2 million people, according to the most recent data.

People who work in hospitals perform a wide range of jobs, including nurses who take care of patients, lab technologists who run complicated tests to detect disease, and radiology technicians who manage the scans that can help diagnose patients.

Those skilled occupations could explain why hospital workers tend to make more than the average healthcare worker. The average hospital worker made $33 an hour and worked just over 37 hours a week on average, according to preliminary government data from March of this year.

There are about 6,210 hospitals across the US today, according to industry group the American Hospital Association, ranging from nonprofit community ones to for-profit hospitals and hospitals run by state and local governments or the federal government.

Here are some of the more prominent occupations at hospitals, and how much they make:


30. Janitors and cleaners, except maids and housekeeping cleaners, earn a median of $29,820 a year, and there are 73,250 employed in hospitals.

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ER Productions Limited/Getty Images

What they do, according to O*NET: Keep buildings in clean and orderly condition. Perform heavy cleaning duties, such as cleaning floors, shampooing rugs, washing walls and glass, and removing rubbish. Duties may include tending furnace and boiler, performing routine maintenance activities, notifying management of need for repairs, and cleaning snow or debris from sidewalk.


29. Orderlies earn a median of $30,200 a year, and there are 39,880 employed in hospitals.

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Spotmatik Ltd/Shutterstock

What they do, according to O*NET: Transport patients to areas such as operating rooms or X-ray rooms using wheelchairs, stretchers, or moveable beds. May maintain stocks of supplies or clean and transport equipment.


28. Nursing assistants earn a median of $31,530 a year, and there are 405,340 employed in hospitals.

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Getty Images

What they do, according to O*NET: Provide basic patient care under direction of nursing staff. Perform duties such as feed, bathe, dress, groom, or move patients, or change linens. May transfer or transport patients. Includes nursing care attendants, nursing aides, and nursing attendants.


27. Cooks (institution and cafeteria) earn a median of $31,930 a year, and there are 35,050 employed in hospitals.

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Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images

What they do, according to O*NET: Prepare and cook large quantities of food for institutions, such as schools, hospitals, or cafeterias; clean and inspect galley equipment, kitchen appliances, and work areas to ensure cleanliness and functional operation.


26. Phlebotomists earn a median of $34,750 a year, and there are 47,240 employed in hospitals.

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Tim Boyle/Getty Images

What they do, according to O*NET: Draw blood for tests, transfusions, donations, or research. May explain the procedure to patients and assist in the recovery of patients with adverse reactions.


25. Security guards earn a median of $36,680 a year, and there are 43,130 employed in hospitals.

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ER Productions Limited/Getty Images

What they do, according to O*NET: Guard, patrol, or monitor premises to prevent theft, violence, or infractions of rules. May operate X-ray and metal detector equipment.


24. Emergency medical technicians and paramedics earn a median of $38,710 a year, and there are 47,790 employed in hospitals.

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Joerg Koch / Stringer / Getty Images

What they do, according to O*NET: Assess injuries, administer emergency medical care, and extricate trapped individuals. Transport injured or sick persons to medical facilities.


23. Pharmacy technicians earn a median of $38,940 a year, and there are 68,730 employed in hospitals.

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Reuters

What they do, according to O*NET: Prepare medications under the direction of a pharmacist. May measure, mix, count out, label, and record amounts and dosages of medications according to prescription orders.


22. Medical records and health information technicians earn a median of $46,520 a year, and there are 71,660 employed in hospitals.

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BSIP/Getty Images

What they do, according to O*NET: Compile, process, and maintain medical records of hospital and clinic patients in a manner consistent with medical, administrative, ethical, legal, and regulatory requirements of the health care system. Process, maintain, compile, and report patient information for health requirements and standards in a manner consistent with the healthcare industry’s numerical coding system.


21. Surgical technologists earn a median of $48,670 a year, and there are 79,080 employed in hospitals.

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BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

What they do, according to O*NET: Assist in operations, under the supervision of surgeons, registered nurses, or other surgical personnel. May help set up operating room, prepare and transport patients for surgery, adjust lights and equipment, pass instruments and other supplies to surgeons and surgeon’s assistants, hold retractors, cut sutures, and help count sponges, needles, supplies, and instruments.


20. Clinical laboratory technologists and technicians earn a median of $55,890 a year, and there are 160,510 employed in hospitals.

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Andy Cross/Getty Images

What they do, according to O*NET: Perform complex medical laboratory tests for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. May train or supervise staff. Operate, calibrate, or maintain equipment used in quantitative or qualitative analysis, such as spectrophotometers, calorimeters, flame photometers, or computer-controlled analyzers.


19. Public relations specialists earn a median of $62,460 a year, and there are 4,720 employed in hospitals.

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Mike Windle/Getty Images

What they do, according to O*NET: Engage in promoting or creating an intended public image for individuals, groups, or organizations. May write or select material for release to various communications media.


18. Dietitians and nutritionists earn a median of $62,720 a year, and there are 20,780 employed in hospitals.

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Flickr/U.S. Department of Agriculture

What they do, according to O*NET: Plan and conduct food service or nutritional programs to assist in the promotion of health and control of disease. May supervise activities of a department providing quantity food services, counsel individuals, or conduct nutritional research.


17. Radiologic technologists earn a median of $62,760 a year, and there are 123,820 employed in hospitals.

What they do, according to O*NET: Take X-rays and CAT scans or administer nonradioactive materials into patient’s blood stream for diagnostic purposes. Includes technologists who specialize in other scanning modalities.


16. Healthcare social workers earn a median of $64,510 a year, and there are 49,280 employed in hospitals.

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Shutterstock/ChameleonsEye

What they do, according to O*NET: Provide individuals, families, and groups with the psychosocial support needed to cope with chronic, acute, or terminal illnesses. Services include advising family care givers, providing patient education and counseling, and making referrals for other services. May also provide care and case management or interventions designed to promote health, prevent disease, and address barriers to access to healthcare.


15. Registered nurses earn a median of $77,670 a year, and there are 1,800,850 employed in hospitals.

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Getty Images

What they do, according to O*NET: Assess patient health problems and needs, develop and implement nursing care plans, and maintain medical records. Administer nursing care to ill, injured, convalescent, or disabled patients. May advise patients on health maintenance and disease prevention or provide case management. Licensing or registration required.


14. Nuclear medicine technologists earn a median of $78,610 a year, and there are 13,890 employed in hospitals.

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COD Newsroom/flickr

What they do, according to O*NET: Prepare, administer, and measure radioactive isotopes in therapeutic, diagnostic, and tracer studies using a variety of radioisotope equipment. Prepare stock solutions of radioactive materials and calculate doses to be administered by radiologists. Subject patients to radiation. Execute blood volume, red cell survival, and fat absorption studies following standard laboratory techniques.


13. Physical therapists earn a median of $89,750 a year, and there are 62,630 employed in hospitals.

What they do, according to O*NET: Assess, plan, organize, and participate in rehabilitative programs that improve mobility, relieve pain, increase strength, and improve or correct disabling conditions resulting from disease or injury.


12. Physician assistants earn a median of $109,000 a year, and there are 29,710 employed in hospitals.

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Joe Raedle / Getty Images

What they do, according to O*NET: Provide healthcare services typically performed by a physician, under the supervision of a physician. Conduct complete physicals, provide treatment, and counsel patients. May, in some cases, prescribe medication. Must graduate from an accredited educational program for physician assistants.


11. Nurse practitioners earn a median of $113,820 a year, and there are 47,560 employed in hospitals.

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COD Newsroom/Flickr

What they do, according to O*NET: Diagnose and treat acute, episodic, or chronic illness, independently or as part of a healthcare team. May focus on health promotion and disease prevention. May order, perform, or interpret diagnostic tests such as lab work and X-rays. May prescribe medication. Must be registered nurses who have specialized graduate education.


10. Medical and health-services managers earn a median of $122,330 a year, and there are 131,220 employed in hospitals.

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sturti/Getty Images

What they do, according to O*NET: Plan, direct, or coordinate medical and health services in hospitals, clinics, managed care organizations, public health agencies, or similar organizations.


9. Pharmacists earn a median of $125,430 a year, and there are 80,010 employed in hospitals.

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Reuters/Elijah Nouvelage

What they do, according to O*NET: Dispense drugs prescribed by physicians and other health practitioners and provide information to patients about medications and their use. May advise physicians and other health practitioners on the selection, dosage, interactions, and side effects of medications.


8. Financial managers earn a median of $146,540 a year, and there are 9,670 employed in hospitals.

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Tom Werner/Getty Images

What they do, according to O*NET: Plan, direct, or coordinate accounting, investing, banking, insurance, securities, and other financial activities of a branch, office, or department of an establishment.


7. Internists (general) earn a median of $164,410 a year, and there are 10,780 employed in hospitals.

What they do, according to O*NET: Physicians who diagnose and provide non-surgical treatment of diseases and injuries of internal organ systems. Provide care mainly for adults who have a wide range of problems associated with the internal organs.


6. Nurse anesthetists earn a median of $186,840 a year, and there are 13,700 employed in hospitals.

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ChaNaWiT/Shutterstock

What they do, according to O*NET: Administer anesthesia, monitor patients’ vital signs, and oversee patient recovery from anesthesia. May assist anesthesiologists, surgeons, other physicians, or dentists. Must be registered nurses who have specialized graduate education.


5. Family and general practitioners earn a median of $206,430 a year, and there are 21,260 employed in hospitals.

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Jim Bourg/Reuters

What they do, according to O*NET: Physicians who diagnose, treat, and help prevent diseases and injuries that commonly occur in the general population. May refer patients to specialists when needed for further diagnosis or treatment.


4. Anesthesiologists earn a median of $211,540 a year, and there are 3,950 employed in hospitals.

What they do, according to O*NET: Physicians who administer anesthetics prior to, during, or after surgery or other medical procedures.


3. Obstetricians and gynecologists earn a median of $215,710 a year, and there are 3,350 employed in hospitals.

What they do, according to O*NET: Physicians who provide medical care related to pregnancy or childbirth and those who diagnose, treat, and help prevent diseases of women, particularly those affecting the reproductive system. May also provide general medical care to women.


2. Surgeons earn a median of $226,080 a year, and there are 7,220 employed in hospitals.

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Phalinn Ooi/Flickr

What they do, according to O*NET: Physicians who treat diseases, injuries, and deformities by invasive, minimally invasive, or noninvasive surgical methods, such as using instruments, appliances, or by manual manipulation.


1. Chief executives earn a median of $242,550 a year, and there are 4,440 employed in hospitals.

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Richard J. Murphy, CEO of South Nassau Communities Hospital.
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Newsday LLC/Getty Images

What they do, according to O*NET: Determine and formulate policies and provide overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. Plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.

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